Title

Diet and serum carotenoid concentrations affect macular pigment optical density in adults 45 years and older

Abstract

The dietary carotenoids lutein (L) and zeaxanthin (Z) are the principal components of macular pigment (MP). Protection of the central retina by MP is suggested, but data are limited. Dietary practices and serum carotenoid concentrations were investigated in 98 adults, 45-73 y old, in relation to MP. Macular pigment optical density (MPOD) was measured at 4 loci: 10 min (10', 30 min (30'), 60 min (60'), and 120 min (120') retinal eccentricity. Serum L + Z concentrations in fasting subjects were correlated with MPOD: 10' (r = 0.29, P = 0.008), 30' (r = 0.342, P = 0.0006), and 60' (r = 0.73, P = 0.001) eccentricity. Dietary L + Z was positively correlated with M POD: 10' (r = 0.24, P = 0.02), 30' (r = 0.237, P = 0.02), 60' (r = 0.27, P = 0.009), and 120' (r = 0.25, P = 0.02) eccentricity. The lowest fruit and vegetable consumers had lower MPOD at 30' (P = 0.01), 60' (P = 0.03), and 120' (P = 0.006) eccentricity compared with the highest consumers. Based on age quartiles (45-49 y), (50-55 y), (56-61 y), and (62-74 y), the youngest and oldest had higher MPOD than those 56-61 y at 60' (P < 0.05). Compared with those with a BMI (kg/m(2)) &GE; 27, those with a BMI < 27 had higher serum concentrations of β-carotene (P = 0.002), and higher MPOD at 60' (P = 0.04) and 120' (P = 0.01). These findings suggest that carotenoid-rich diets and serum carotenoids positively contribute to MP status.

Publication Date

5-1-2005

Journal Title

Journal of Nutrition

Publisher

American Society of Nutrition

Scientific Contribution Number

2158

Document Type

Article

Rights

© 2005 American Society for Nutritional Sciences.