Date

4-2020

Project Type

URC Presentation

Department

Political Science

College or School

COLA

Class Year

Senior

Major

Political Science

Faculty Research Advisor

Dante Scala

Abstract

Have evangelicalism and religiosity become more or less statistically significant in determining state-wide voting behavior in the 21st century? This research conducted a multiple regression analysis that compared religious, demographic, and economic information with the percent of votes cast for the Republican candidate in the 2000, 2004, 2008, 2012, and 2016 elections.

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Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
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If QR code no longer works, the following is a list of references (proceeded by its corresponding number) and data sources: ==Sources used in Background & Analysis== 1 Stanley, Harold W. “Presidential Elections and the South.” Writing Southern Politics: Contemporary Interpretations and Future Directions, edited by Robert P. Steed and Laurence W. Moreland, University Press of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, 2006, pp. 219–240. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt130hw9b.14. Accessed 21 Apr. 2020. 2 Berggren, D. Jason, and Nicol C. Rae. “Jimmy Carter and George W. Bush: Faith, Foreign Policy, and an Evangelical Presidential Style.” Presidential Studies Quarterly, vol. 36, no. 4, 2006, pp. 606–632. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/27552257. Accessed 21 Apr. 2020. 3 “Evangelical Approval of President Bush.” Pew Research Center, 27 Aug. 2007, pewrsr.ch/12Ah9kd. 4 Haberman, Clyde. “Religion and Right-Wing Politics: How Evangelicals Reshaped Elections.” The New York Times, The New York Times, 28 Oct. 2018, www.nytimes.com/2018/10/28/us/religion-politics-evangelicals.html. 5 “Evangelical Protestants - Religion in America: U.S. Religious Data, Demographics and Statistics.” Pew Research Center's Religion & Public Life Project, 11 May 2015, www.pewforum.org/religious-landscape-study/religious-tradition/evangelical-protestant/. 6 LUHRMANN, TANYA MARIE. “EVANGELICAL VOTERS.” Antidemocracy in America: Truth, Power, and the Republic at Risk, edited by ERIC KLINENBERG et al., Columbia University Press, New York; Chichester, West Sussex, 2019, pp. 167–174. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/10.7312/klin19010.22. Accessed 21 Apr. 2020. 7 Smith, Daniel A., et al. “Same-Sex Marriage Ballot Measures and the 2004 Presidential Election.” State & Local Government Review, vol. 38, no. 2, 2006, pp. 78–91. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/4355421. Accessed 21 Apr. 2020. 8 Goodstein, Laurie. “Vatican Cardinal Signals Backing for Sanctions on Kerry.” The New York Times, The New York Times, 24 Apr. 2004, www.nytimes.com/2004/04/24/us/2004-campaign-abortion-issue-vatican-cardinal-signals-backing-for-sanctions.html. ==Data Sources== Newport, Frank. “5 Things to Know About Evangelicals in America.” Gallup.com, Gallup, 8 Apr. 2020, news.gallup.com/opinion/polling-matters/235208/things-know-evangelicals-america.aspx. “US Census Bureau | Data Finder.” Data.census.gov, US Census Bureau | Data, data.census.gov/cedsci/. Association of Statisticians of American Religious Bodies. “Religious Congregations and Membership Study, 2000 (State File).” | Data Archive | The Association of Religion Data Archives, The Association of Religion Data Archives, 1 Jan. 2000, www.thearda.com/Archive/Files/Descriptions/RCMSST.asp. Association of Statisticians of American Religious Bodies. “Religious Congregations and Membership Study, 2010 (State File).” | Data Archive | The Association of Religion Data Archives, The Association of Religion Data Archives, 1 Jan. 2000, www.thearda.com/Archive/Files/Descriptions/RCMSST.asp. “U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.” U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 17 Apr. 2020, www.bls.gov/.

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