Institute on Disability
 

Title

Linking public housing, employment, and disability benefits for working-age people with disabilities

Abstract

Since the 1990s, US housing policy has emphasized increasing the economic self-sufficiency of assisted households. However, an estimated 41% of working-age public housing tenants have a disability, and many participate in multiple public benefit programs. We explore this policy dilemma by asking: (1) do levels of employment vary between people with disabilities who are and who are not residing in public housing, and (2) do the types of disabilities vary by those who are and who are not residing in public housing? We also consider whether or not answers vary based on household receipt of public disability benefits. Results from the Current Population Survey suggest that working-age people with disabilities who live in public housing but do not receive disability program benefits are significantly less likely to be employed than disabled non-beneficiaries who do not reside in public housing. No differences in employment levels are noted between Social Security disability program participants who do and do not live in public housing. Some significant differences in types of disabilities were noted among disability program participants who do and do not reside in public housing. We discuss policy implications and suggestions for further research.

Publication Date

8-14-2015

Journal Title

Housing and Society

Publisher

Taylor & Francis

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

10.1080/08882746.2015.1076130

Document Type

Article