https://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0013916585173003">
 

Title

Self-reported and actual savings in a water-conservation campaign

Abstract

Data from a survey questionnaire and from water utility billing records are used to compare self-reported and actual water savings for 471 households during a conservation campaign. Self-reports are only weakly related to actual changes in water consumption. Errors are widespread, and not wholly random: The accuracy of self-reports increases with household socioeconomic status and with the extent of conservation behavior. The large and nonrandom error component makes self-reports questionable as a proxy for objective measures of overall water savings in conservation research. Because knowledge about water use is both generally low and related to conservation behavior, informational feedback may be a particularly effective strategy for increasing conservation. The effectiveness of this feedback may increase with social class, however.

Publication Date

5-1-1985

Journal Title

Environment and Behavior

Publisher

Sage

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

https://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0013916585173003

Document Type

Article

Rights

© 1985 Sage Publications, Inc.

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