Title

Home-to-Work Conflict, Work Qualities, and Emotional Distress

Abstract

Among a representative sample of employed men and women in Toronto, Canada, home-to-work conflict is associated positively with anxiety and depression. Two hypotheses propose work qualities as moderators. The double disadvantage hypothesis predicts that home-to-work conflict is more distressing when work is nonautonomous, routine, or noxious. The intrusion on job status/rewards hypothesis predicts that conflict is more distressing when work is autonomous, nonroutine, or nonnoxious. Results show that the association between home-to-work conflict and distress is stronger (1) among people in more autonomous jobs; (2) among women in routinized jobs; and (3) among men in noxious environments.

Publication Date

3-2003

Journal Title

Sociological Forum

Publisher

Springer

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

10.1023/A:1022658929709

Document Type

Article

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