https://dx.doi.org/10.1086/676938">
 

Abstract

Collaboration is an essential skill for modern ecologists because it brings together diverse expertise, viewpoints, and study systems. The Lotic Intersite Nitrogen eXperiments (LINX I and II), a 17-y research endeavor involving scores of early- to late-career stream ecologists, is an example of the benefits, challenges, and approaches of successful collaborative research in ecology. The scientific success of LINX reflected tangible attributes including clear scientific goals (hypothesis-driven research), coordinated research methods, a team of cooperative scientists, excellent leadership, extensive communication, and a philosophy of respect for input from all collaborators. Intangible aspects of the collaboration included camaraderie and strong team chemistry. LINX further benefited from being part of a discipline in which collaboration is a tradition, clear data-sharing and authorship guidelines, an approach that melded field experiments and modeling, and a shared collaborative goal in the form of a universal commitment to see the project and resulting data products through to completion.

Publication Date

9-1-2014

Journal Title

Freshwater Science

Publisher

University of Chicago Press

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

https://dx.doi.org/10.1086/676938

Document Type

Article

Rights

© 2014 by The Society for Freshwater Science. This is an article published by The Society for Freshwater Science in Freshwater Science in 2014, available online: https://dx.doi.org/10.1086/676938

Share

COinS