https://dx.doi.org/10.1175/2008BAMS2556.1">
 

Abstract

Northern Eurasia, the largest landmass in the northern extratropics, accounts for ~20% of the global land area. However, little is known about how the biogeochemical cycles, energy and water cycles, and human activities specific to this carbon-rich, cold region interact with global climate. A major concern is that changes in the distribution of land-based life, as well as its interactions with the environment, may lead to a self-reinforcing cycle of accelerated regional and global warming. With this as its motivation, the Northern Eurasian Earth Science Partnership Initiative (NEESPI) was formed in 2004 to better understand and quantify feedbacks between northern Eurasian and global climates. The first group of NEESPI projects has mostly focused on assembling regional databases, organizing improved environmental monitoring of the region, and studying individual environmental processes. That was a starting point to addressing emerging challenges in the region related to rapidly and simultaneously changing climate, environmental, and societal systems. More recently, the NEESPI research focus has been moving toward integrative studies, including the development of modeling capabilities to project the future state of climate, environment, and societies in the NEESPI domain. This effort will require a high level of integration of observation programs, process studies, and modeling across disciplines.

Publication Date

5-1-2009

Journal Title

Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society

Publisher

American Meteorological Society (AMS)

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

https://dx.doi.org/10.1175/2008BAMS2556.1

Document Type

Article

Rights

This is an article published by American Meteorological Society (AMS) in Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society in 2009, available online: https://dx.doi.org/10.1175/2008BAMS2556.1

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