Title

Technical note: Adipose tissue blood flow in miniature swine (Sus scrofa) using the (133)xenon washout technique

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the 133 xenon washout technique as a viable method for measuring adipose tissue blood flow (ATBF) in swine. Using a total of 32 female Yucatan miniature swine (Sus scrofa), the partition coefficient for 133 xenon in swine subcutaneous adipose tissue was determined and ATBF was measured at rest and under various physiological conditions. These conditions included feeding, anesthesia, epinephrine infusion, and acute exercise. The effects of epinephrine and acute exercise were examined in both sedentary and exercise-trained swine. The partition coefficient value for 133 xenon in swine subcutaneous adipose tissue was 9.23 +/- 0.26 mL/g (mean +/- SD, n = 10). The average value for resting ATBF in swine was 3.98 +/- 2.72 mL/(100 g tissue.min) (n = 19). Feeding increased ATBF by approximately fivefold over fasting values, and isoflurane anesthesia significantly decreased ATBF compared to rest (1.64 +/- 1.12 vs 3.92 +/- 4.22 mL/[100 g.min], n = 10). A 30-min epinephrine infusion (1 mug/[kg BW.min]) significantly increased ATBF from a resting value of 3.13 +/- 2.61 to 10.35 +/- 5.31 mL/(100 g-min) (n = 12). Epinephrine infusion into exercise-trained swine increased ATBF to the same extent as when infused into sedentary swine. An acute, 20-min bout of exercise significantly increased ATBF in swine, and the sedentary swine showed a larger increase in ATBF than their exercise-trained littermates relative to rest: 7.83 vs 2.98 mL/(100 g.min). In conclusion, the (133)xenon washout technique appears to be a viable method for measuring ATBF in swine; our findings are comparable to swine ATBF values reported using the microsphere method and are consistent with values reported in animal and human studies.

Publication Date

5-1-2002

Journal Title

Journal of animal science

Publisher

American Society of Animal Science

Scientific Contribution Number

2103

Document Type

Article

Rights

Copyright © 2002 by American Society of Animal Science