https://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ncomms11448">
 

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Abstract

Whole-genome sequencing has provided fundamental insights into infectious disease epidemiology, but has rarely been used for examining transmission dynamics of a bacterial pathogen in wildlife. In the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE), outbreaks of brucellosis have increased in cattle along with rising seroprevalence in elk. Here we use a genomic approach to examine Brucella abortus evolution, cross-species transmission and spatial spread in the GYE. We find that brucellosis was introduced into wildlife in this region at least five times. The diffusion rate varies among Brucella lineages (∼3 to 8 km per year) and over time. We also estimate 12 host transitions from bison to elk, and 5 from elk to bison. Our results support the notion that free-ranging elk are currently a self-sustaining brucellosis reservoir and the source of livestock infections, and that control measures in bison are unlikely to affect the dynamics of unrelated strains circulating in nearby elk populations.

Publication Date

5-11-2016

Journal Title

Nature Communications

Publisher

Springer Nature

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

https://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ncomms11448

Scientific Contribution Number

2664

Document Type

Article

Comments

This is an article published by Nature Publishing Group in Nature Communications in 2016, available online: https://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ncomms11448

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