Title

Inter-parental conflict and sibling warmth during adolescence: Associations with female depression in emerging adulthood

Abstract

Summary.—Grounded in Grych and Fincham's cognitive appraisal theory, this study examined whether female emerging adults' (N = 216) recalled sibling warmth moderated the relationship between exposure to inter-parental conflict in adolescence and their current depression. Findings indicated that sibling warmth moderated the relationship between the intensity and frequency of inter-parental conflict and depression, but not inter-parental conflict resolution. Compared to female emerging adults who reported lower sibling warmth, those who reported higher sibling warmth in the face of greater intensity and higher frequency of inter-parental conflict during adolescence had lower depression. The important role of siblings for youth from conflicted homes was highlighted.

Publication Date

2-2013

Journal Title

Psychological Reports

Publisher

Ammons Scientific

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

10.2466/21.10.PR0.112.1.243-251

Document Type

Article

Rights

The official published version of this article can be found at [http://www.amsciepub.com/doi/full/10.2466/21.10.PR0.112.1.243-251]. This is a final authors’ draft of the paper: Corinna Jenkins Tucker, Melissa Holt, and Desiree Wiesen-Martin (2013) INTER-PARENTAL CONFLICT AND SIBLING WARMTH DURING ADOLESCENCE: ASSOCIATIONS WITH FEMALE DEPRESSION IN EMERGING ADULTHOOD,. Psychological Reports: Volume 112, Issue , pp. 243-251. © Psychological Reports 2013