Abstract

[1] Alongshore winds in Baja California strongly influence nearshore temperatures hundreds of kilometers to the north at Point Loma, San Diego, California, on timescales of a week to a year. The time lag between wind and temperature is consistent with first mode coastal trapped wave phase speed. The nearshore cross-shelf circulation forced by the coastal trapped waves is, at least much of the year, oppositely directed at the surface and bottom. No relation is found between the winds and temperature for periods greater than a year. It is argued that similar results may be found elsewhere in the Southern California Bight. The relationship between stratification and bottom temperature varies over the 1.3 years of data, but for much of the time, warmer bottom waters are associated with even warmer surface waters and thus stronger stratification. The effects of the remotely forced cross-shelf exchange on coastal pollution, nutrient dynamics, and larval transport are briefly discussed.

Publication Date

4-30-2003

Journal Title

Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans

Publisher

AMERICAN GEOPHYSICAL UNION

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

10.1029/2002JC001447

Document Type

Article

Rights

Copyright 2003 by the American Geophysical Union

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