Abstract

A number of public safety-net programs exist to help improve the economic well-being of vulnerable children, but little is known about the extent to which families with a child maltreatment report receive these services over time. In this brief, we examine the incidence of receiving four types of income support both immediately after the child maltreatment report and eighteen months following. The data for this analysis come from the second National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being (NSCAW II), a national sample of children who had a maltreatment report that resulted in an investigation by CPS within a 15-month period beginning in February 2008.

Authors Wendy Walsh and Marybeth Mattingly report that the child protective system, especially in rural areas, may link families to needed supports. Among families who did not initially report safety net receipt and reported financial challenges, more rural (51 percent) than urban (38 percent) received at least one safety net program eighteen months later. Among families who did not initially report safety net receipt and reported financial challenges, more rural (38 percent) than urban (7 percent) families said they were managing to “save a little money each month” eighteen months after their encounter with the child protective system.

Publication Date

Spring 6-16-2015

Series

National Issue Brief No. 83

Publisher

Durham, N.H. : Carsey School of Public Policy, University of New Hampshire

Document Type

Article

Rights

Copyright 2015. Carsey School of Public Policy. These materials may be used for the purposes of research, teaching, and private study. For all other uses, contact the copyright holder.

Included in

Sociology Commons

Share

COinS